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vendredi 25 mars 2016

Déodat Roché



Déodat Roché

1877 – 1978
Déodat Roché est une figure cathare du XXème siècle. Il pensait le catharisme à travers le savoir scientifique et les connaissances en histoire des religions qui étaient disponibles en son temps. Il a vu le catharisme à travers le prisme maçonnique et l’enseignement anthroposophique.
Tel n’est pas notre propre cheminement. Nous pensons en effet que la philosophie cathare, profondément chrétienne, se suffit à elle-même. Simplicité et non-violence constituent le but de notre quête et l’accomplissement de notre vie en l’absence de Dieu. Néanmoins, Déodat Roché eut le grand mérite de témoigner de son vécu cathare, d’intellectualiser le message et de relever l’esprit des Albigeois. Il fut un véritable relais dans la génération précédente.

Déodat Roché sur le chemin de Monsegur oil by Claude Dubois
tableau visible dans le musée de la ville d'Arques  (au 1er étage du musée  
  
                            d'info :    

lundi 14 mars 2016

MONSEGUR

 
MONSEGUR Oil by Claude Dubois
 
the day of the 215 Cathars burned at the foot of POG Monsegur
the wolves are drawn to the bodies that are burning smell.
SCENE attroce the smoky smell and excitation monks and soldiers of the king's army.
OCCITAN me I can not forget I can not forgive, I became a Anticlerical Irreversible

LES CATHARES !!!

                
  
                       Clergy in Languedoc rich and corrupt.
             the Vatican is the home of  SATAN

21 sites du pays cathare



The 21 castles, abbeys, museums and villages of Cathar tell the medieval history of this territory. Beautiful photos of a protected territory.

Les 21 châteaux, abbayes, musées et villages du Pays Cathare racontent l'histoire médiévale de ce territoire. Magnifiques photos d'un territoire préservé.

HISTOIRE : La fin du mouvement Cathare.(Docu France 5)


( Lo Dia Maria ) MODERN group NADAU TROUBADOUR


Mise en ligne le 18 oct. 2009
Una auta canson de mon pais !

MODERN group NADAU TROUBADOUR OCCITAN
 the Troubadours
Modern European literature originated in Occitania in the early 12th century.  It was started by hundreds of Troubadours (poet-musicians), who sang the praises of new values and in a new way.   Their themes were courtly love, and concepts such as "convivencia" and "paratge" for which there is no modern counterpart in modern English or French.   "convivencia" meant something more than conviviality and "paratge" meant something much more than honour, courtesy, chivalry or gentility. Troubadours praised high ideals, promoting a spirit of equality based on common virtue and deprecating discrimination based on blood or wealth.  They were responsible for a great flowering of creativity.  The lyrics could be racy, even by modern standards.  Woman troubadours as well as men were welcomed in Châteaux throughout the Midi.  They were loathed by the Roman Church.

Their influence was profound and far-reaching, giving rise to the development of virtually all modern western literature other than religious "legends". Dante can be classed as a troubadour; and troubadour influences clearly apparent in writers like Geoffery Chaucer, John Gower, Marie de France, Chretien de Troyes, Gottfried von Strassburg and Thomas Malory. They shaped much of our modern romanticised concept of medieval life - right down to ladies awarding favours to knights bearing their colours in jousting tournaments. Among the many direct descendants of their work might be counted a range of modern genres, from biographies to novels; from war stories to political satires; and from soft pornography to Mills and Boon style romances. The very word romance with its modern connotations is a Troubadour invention. The word began as the name for a narrative poem about chivalric heroes.


The concept of paratge is still known and respected in the Languedoc. On the eight hundredth anniversary of the massacre of Cathars by French Catholic crusaders at Minerve on 22 July 1210, the inhabitants of the town installed a memorial to their ancestors - shown below. It says, in Occitan: "Minerve remembers PARATGE!"

significance or meaning of the word in medieval Occitania.



"Paratge" translates literally into English as peerage, but this gives almost no clue to the significance or meaning of the word in medieval Occitania.
Paratge denoted a whole world-view, almost a philosophy, as alien to the modern mind as it was to the medieval French Crusaders. The word meant something more than honour, courtesy, nobility, chivalry or gentility though our concepts of honour, courtesy, nobility, chivalry and gentility all owe something to the concept of "paratge". 
The word also carried implications of balance, natural order, and what is right. Paratge does not seem to have been a distinctly Cathar notion. The Count of Toulouse could reportedly use the word to the Pope in reminding him of his duty to paratge. In any case we have no indication of any disagreement between the two belief systems, which appear to have coexisted in complete harmony. If it seems odd that we have even the faintest echo of the concept in English, it is well to remember that Occitan was the first language of many in England, including two queens (Eleanor of Aquitaine, and John's wife Isobel) and an English King, Richard I).

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The nearest concept to paratge we know of elsewhere seems to be the ancient Egyptian idea of Ma'aht - another untranslatable word carrying suggestions of right, cosmic balance and natural order to which may be added ideas of contentment, joy and light. (Ma'aht was embodied as a goddess, and played a part in the development of Christian concepts of heaven and hell). The ancient Greeks seem to have had a similar idea. The word kosmos, the origin of our word cosmos, meant not just the universe but a state of universal order and harmony. Plato, in Meno, (apparently referring specifically to the Pythagoreans) says "The wise men tell us that heaven and earth, and gods and men, are bound together by kinship, love, orderliness, temperance and justice; and for this reason my friend they give to the whole the name kosmos, not a name implying disorder or licenciousness". In the modern world, the nearest we can come to it is probably in Eastern philosophies: the yin-yang and the Buddhist ideas of karma and what is "right".
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The word paratge was used extensively in Occitan writings, and it features heavily in the works of troubadours and especially in the Song of the Cathar Wars. If you knew that a man upheld paratge, then that was pretty much all you needed to know about him. Similarly, if you knew that he despised paratge then again that was all you needed to know.
In the latter part of the Canso (The Song of the Cathar Wars)  written in Occitan the writer is horrified and mystified that the French invaders seem to have no respect for paratge, or even any understanding of it. The charge is more serious than any other - indeed it probably encompasses all the others - deceit, brutality, vandalism, lying, hypocrisy, even mass-murder. Here is an observation, laisse 137, referring to the French Catholic Crusader victory over the joint forces of King Pedro II of Aragon and Count Raymond VI of Toulouse defending their lands at Muret:
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Toto lo mons ne valg mens, de ver o sapiatz,
Car Paratges NE fo destruitz e decassatz
E totz Crestianesmes aonitz abassatz.
It diminished the whole world, be sure of that,
For it destroyed and drove out paratge,
It disgraced and shamed all Christendom.
Here is a later example from a famous coruscating indictment of a dead crusade leader, Simon de Montfort, refering to the epitaph on his original tomb at the Cathedral of Saint-Nazaire in Carcassonne. The inscription on it is now lost, but we know that it envisaged Simon as a saint enthroned in heaven, enjoying God's reward for his earthly deeds:

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Context Occitan Text English Translation
Laisse 151. Raymond VI, Count of Toulouse rails at Pope Innocent III for thinking to dispossess the count's son of his inheritance. E l'efans, que no sab ni falhir ni pecar, Mandas sa terra toldre e lo vols decassar! E tu, que deus Paratge e Merce guovernar, Membre•t Dieus e Paratges e no•m laiches pecar ...And the boy, not capable of doing wrong: you order his fiefs to be taken from him and for him to be driven out! You who should rule by mercy and paratge! Be mindful of paratge and of God!
Laisse 154. Guy of Cavillon gives advice to the young Raymond future Raymond VII, outlining his duty to paratge. ... lo coms de Montfort que destrui Los baros e la gleiza de Roma e la prezicacios fa estar tot Paratge aunit e vergonhos, qu'en aisi Es Paratges tornatz de sus en jos; que si per vos no•s leva per totz tems Es rescos. E si Pretz e Paratges no•s restaura per vos, doncs Es lo mortz Paratges e totz lo mons en vos. E pus de tot Paratge etz vera sospeisos, o totz, Paratges moria o vos que siatz pros! ...the count of Montfort who destroys men, he and the Church at Rome and the preachers are covering paratge with shame. They have cast it down from its high place, and if you do not raise it up, it will vanish for ever. If worth and paratge do not rise again through you, then paratge will die - with it the whole world will die. You are the true hope of all paratge and the choice is yours: either you show valour, or paratge dies!
Laisse 137 and Laisse 141: On the defeat of King Peter II of Aragon and Raymond VI of Toulouse at the battle of Muret in 1213
Totz lo mons NE valg mens, de ver o sapiatz, car Paratges NE FO destruitz e decassatz. E totz Crestianesmes aonitz e abassatz.

... A tot Crestianesme et a trastotas gens

It diminished the whole world, be sure of that, for it destroyed and drove out paratge. It disgraced and shamed all Christendom.

...It dishonoured the whole of Christendom and all humanity.
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The concept of paratge is still known and respected in the Languedoc. On the eight hundredth anniversary of the massacre of Cathars by French Catholic crusaders at Minerve on 22 July 1210, the inhabitants of the town installed a memorial to their ancestors - shown below. It says, in Occitan: "Minerve remembers PARATGE!"

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An Excursus
In many respects an upholder of paratge resembled a perfect knight and an ideal gentleman. King Richard I of England was familiar with the concept - he was from the Aquitaine himself, the son of Eleanor of Aquitaine and the great grandson of William IX the first troubadour. He was a fluent speaker of Occitan and must certainly have understood and respected paratge. He himself was a troubadour and was greatly esteemed in his time. Even his Moslem enemies called him Melek Ric - the True King.
Yet Richard was not the greatest embodiment of the ideal of Paratge. The two men remembered by English history who perhaps most embodied the ideals of paratge were both alive at the same time as Richard, and both knew him. One was William Marshall. The other was Al-Malik al-Nasir Saleh ed-Din Yusuf, better known to us as Saladin. Both were also renowned and honoured even by their enemies. Richard held them both in the very highest esteem - though he spent years fighting Saladin, and had once had to beg for quarter from William Marshall. History gives us a good indication of both men:
Saladin - Salah al-Dunya al-Din. On one famous occasion, seeing Richard's horse killed beneath him in battle, Saladin sent him another. We also know that Richard offered the hand of his sister in marriage to Saladin's brother. Such was Saladin's reputation that it was widely believed in the West that Saladin had been knighted by Richard, possibly a distorted version of an actual event as Richard had knighted Saladin's nephew. When Muslim raiders took a baby from its Christian mother, she sought out Saladin and appealed to him in person. Moved to tears he had the infant found and returned to her. When one of his dared to bring a legal actuion against him, he left his throne and submitted to trial like anyone else. When he won the case he liberally rewarded his opponent. When he took Jerusalem he forgave Balian of Ibelin who had led the defence, despite having taking an oath not to do so (he had been released on this condition). While the crusaders had slaughtered almost the whole population when they had taken Jerusalem in 1099, Saladin killed not a single citizen when he took it in 1187.
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Richard the Lion Heart
King of England




Richard Iᵉʳ of England said Lion Heart was King of England, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, count of Poitiers, Count of Maine and Count of Anjou 1189 until his death in 1199. He was also a patron of troubadours and wrote poetry. Wikipédia


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http://www.midi-france.info/190403_paratge.htm

dimanche 13 mars 2016

Ms. Gay McDougall, independent expert of the ONU investigated

Ms. Gay McDougall, independent expert of the UN investigated for 10 days in September 2007 on the situation of minorities in France. .................. Of delegations Breton, Basque, Occitan and other types of minorities (religious among others ...) convinced Gay McDougall as ostracism exists on the issue of minorities in France is an issue related to human rights. Before rendering its final report it believed, following her meetings with members of different minority communities that "racism 'pernicious' continues in France (according to the Nouvel Observateur and AFP >>>)." Its initial findings have shaken priori-righteous. The French universalist model does not seem to be the best defense against discrimination. "Equality" as a principle of unity and indivisibility consistently opposed to the plurality and diversity leading to a de facto discrimination. Ms. Gay McDougall concludes his report with a stern statement. "Despite the existence of a major anti-discrimination legislation, members of minority communities in France are victims of genuine racial discrimination, rooted in attitudes and institutions The political refusal to recognize this problem has hindered the adoption of measures to ensure the implementation of relevant legislation and correct complex inequalities that settled. "** racism (against the cursed Occitans) french colonialism and racism against Occitan - "the Gascons are light in words, talkative, mocking, fornicators, drunkards, greedy, badly dressed in rags and without money, yet they are trained in combat and remarkable for their hospitality to the poor Sitting around. fire, they used to eat without a table and drink all in one cup they eat a lot, drink dry and poorly dressed;. they are not ashamed of sleeping together on a thin rotten straw bedding, servants with the master and mistress. "St Jacques de Compostela Pilgrim's Guide, translation of the Latin text of the twelfth century *" And so there is reason to doubt the intelligence desditz arrestz We wish and order qu'ilz are faitz e escritz if clearly that there can be no ambiguity or uncertainty in a place born request interpretation. To pronounce e ship all acts Francoys language. E so that such things are souuent aduenues on the intelligence of Latin content motz esditz arrestz together all other procedures, are of course noz sovereign or other subordinates are less th register, enquestes, ContactZ, commissions, awards, wills, e any other e exploictz acts of justice or who are dependent pronounced, save e desliurez the parties langaige françois breast, e not otherwise. Fines against ceulx that calomieusement get letters to articulate faictz nouveaulx "François 1st King of France, Edict of Villers-Cotterets, August 15, 1539 -. *" To accustom the people to bow to the king, our manners, and customs, there is nothing more that can contribute to ensure that children learn the French language, so that it becomes as familiar as their theirs, if not practically be able to repeal the use of these, at least have the preference in the opinion of the inhabitants of the country "Colbert, in 1666 -. *" It was therefore more vigorous in cold climates. hot countries the people are timid like old men are; those cold countries are courageous as are young people. You will find in the northern climates peoples who have few vices, enough struggled, much sincerity and frankness. Approach the south country, believe away from morality itself: the strongest passions multiply crimes. (In Europe) equilibrium is maintained by the laziness that (nature) hasgiven to the nations of the South, and by industry and activity it gave to those in the North, this is what the naturalizedservitude among the peoples of the south: as they can easily dispense with riches, they can better do without freedom. Northern peoples have and will always have a spirit of independence and freedom that do not have the people of the South. "Montesquieu, The Spirit of Laws. XIV, II, 1748 .......... ........................... the only thing that comes to me is that you can not repent of the massacre of the Cathars without dissolving the Dominican order [...] the bishop - [...] You would do much damage by removing the Dominicans John Paul II was "repentance" I heard him say:.. "We have sincere repentance. "he mentioned the Inquisition. I think there put the Cathars. Because if he had to put all the groups that were persecuted at that time it would have taken to a new book ! [...] the Cathar - [...] freedom of conscience, it is not the freedom to say what we want and say everything and anything freedom of conscience, c. 'is to be free in thought. But it's a very difficult job. If we are awake, compared with ourselves, we realize that we do not think truly. Our self-talk such as our outdoor speech is primarily a speech interest, that is to say, a speech that is related to the appetites of our incarnation. These passions that drive us and whose engine is made up of our interests, to the Cathar thought, they enclose the soul in the body, so that instead of being pure, the soul is imbued appetites of incarnation. Man is a soul, a psyche. The body is the garment in which the soul is imprisoned. If the soul is to take the risks, appetites and passions of the body, at that time, it is closely related to the body. The perfect Cathar purification process, is to live as a man, that is to say, as a soul, a soul that is released, separated from the body. It is in this sense that he may have an immortality project; because the soul purified soul is crystalline, clear as clear water, that is to say, a soul that no longer carries interest speeches, no speeches attached to the body. This is the perception of the divine. [...]

Musée du catharisme de Mazamet

Musée 
musée du catharisme de mazamet, catharisme et patrimoine en montagne noire. ... la maison des mémoires conserve les archives municipales
                                                                    
du catharisme de Mazamet


gift of the artist Claude Dubois of one of its Table oil on wood panel Occitane period of history (Inquisition) the museum of the Cathars mazamet
the massacre of the Church of the Madeleine 7000 death, old men children, massacred all the slices ages, in the church and on the steps of the church, Beziers burned down for three days total environ15.000 has 20,000 dead


                   WEB-is-GOOD:    http://web-is-good.blogspot.fr/
                              

museum Déodat Roché a Arques

 
               Museum Déodat Roché a Arques periode INQUISITION
                           oil by Claude Dubois
 
                  gift of the painter Claude Dubois tables on the 1st floor of the Museum


           catharcountry :    http://www.catharcountry.info/tour_index.htm                               

the Cathar Church

The Cathars were a religious group who appeared in Europe in the eleventh century, their origins something of a mystery though there is reason to believe their ideas came from Persia or the Byzantine Empire, by way of the Balkans and Northern Italy.  Records from the Roman Catholic Church mention them under various names and in various places.  Catholic theologians debated with themselves for centuries whether Cathars were Christian heretics or whether they were not Christians at all.  The question is apparently still open. Roman Catholics still refer to Cathar belief as "the Great Heresy" though the official Catholic position is that Catharism is not Christian at all.
As Dualists, Cathars believed in two principles, a good creator god and his evil adversary (much like God and Satan of mainstream Christianity). Cathars called themselves simply Christians; their neighbours distinguished them as "Good Christians". The Catholic Church called them Albigenses, or less frequently . Cathars.
Cathars maintained a Church The hierarchy and practiced a range of  ceremonies, but rejected any idea of priesthood or the use of church buildings. They divided into ordinary believers who led ordinary medieval lives and an inner Elect of Parfaits (men) and Parfaites (women) who led extremely ascetic lives yet still worked for their living - generally in itinerant manual trades like weaving. Cathars believed in reincarnation and refused to eat meat or other animal products. They were strict about biblical injunctions - notably those about living in poverty, not telling lies, not killing and not swearing oaths.

Basic Cathar Tenets led to some surprising logical implications. For example they largely regarded men and women as equals, and had no doctrinal objection to contraception, euthanasia or suicide. In some respects the Cathar and Catholic Churches were polar opposites. For example the Cathar Church taught that all non-procreative sex was better than any procreative sex. The Catholic Church taught - and still teaches - exactly the opposite. Both positions produced interesting results. Following their tenet, Catholics concluded that masturbation was a far greater sin than rape (as mediaeval penitentials confirm). Following their principles, Cathars could deduce that sexual intercourse between man and wife was more culpable than homosexual sex. (Catholic propaganda on this supposed Cathar proclivity gave us the word bugger, from Bougre, one of the many names for medieval Gnostic Dualists)
In the Languedoc, known at the time for its high culture, tolerance and liberalism, the Cathar religion took root and gained more and more adherents during the twelfth century.  By the early thirteenth century Catharism was probably the majority religion in the area, supported by the nobility as well as the common people. This was yet another annoyance to the Roman Church which considered the feudal system to be divinely ordained as the Natural Order (Cathars disliked the feudal system because it depended on oath taking).  In open debates with leading Catholic theologians Cathars seem to have come out on top. This was embarrassing for the Roman Church, not least because they had fielded the best professional preachers in Europe against what they saw as a collection of uneducated weavers and other manual workers. A significant number of Catholic priests had become Cathar adherents (Catharism was a religion that seems to have appealed especially to the theologically literate).  Worse, the Catholic Church was being held up to public ridicule (some of the richest men in Christendom, bejewelled, vested in finery, and preaching poverty, provided an irresistible target even to contemporary Catholics in the Languedoc). Worst yet, Cathars declined to pay tithes to the Catholic Church. As one senior Churchman observed of the Cathar movement "if it had not been cut back by the swords of the faithful I think it would have corrupted the whole of Europe."
The Cathar view of the Catholic Church was as bleak as the Catholic Church's view of the Cathar Church. On the Cathar side it manifested itself in ridiculing Catholic doctrine and practices, and characterising the Catholic Church as the "Church of Wolves". Catholics accused Cathars of heresy or apostasy and said they belonged to the "Synagogue of Satan". The Catholic side created some striking propaganda. When the propaganda proved unsuccessful, there was only one option left - a crusade - the Albigensian Crusade.
The head of the Catholic Church, Pope Innocent III, called a formal Crusade against the Cathars of the Languedoc, appointing a series of military leaders to head his Holy Army. The first was a Cistercian abbot (Arnaud Amaury), now best remembered for his command at Béziers: "Kill them all. God will know his own". The second was Simon de Montfort now remembered as the father of another Simon de Montfort, a prominent figure in English parliamentary history.  The war against the Cathars of the Languedoc continued for two generations. In the later phases the Kings of France would take over as leaders of the crusade, which thus became a Royal Crusade. Among the many victims who lost their lives were two kings: Peter II King of Aragon cut down at the Battle of Muret in 1213 and Louis VIII King of France who succumbed to dysentery on his way home to Paris in 1226.
From 1208, a war of terror was waged against the indigenous population of the Languedoc and their rulers: Raymond VI of Toulouse,  Raymond-Roger Trencavel, Raymond Roger of Foix in the first generation and Raymond VII of Toulouse, Raymond Trencavel II, and Roger Bernard II of Foix in the second generation. During this period an estimated half-million Languedoc men, women and children were massacred, Catholics as well as Cathars. The Crusaders killed the locals indiscriminately - in line with the the famous injunction recorded by a Cistercian chronicler as being spoken by his fellow Cistercian, the Abbot in command of the Crusader army.
                            
The Counts of Toulouse and their allies were dispossessed and humiliated, and their lands annexed to France.  Educated and tolerant Languedoc rulers were replaced by relative barbarians;  Dominic Guzmán (later Saint Dominic) founded the Dominican Order and soon afterwards the Inquisition, manned by his Dominicans, was established explicitly to wipe out the last vestiges of resistance. Persecutions of Languedoc Jews and other minorities were initiated;  the culture of the troubadours was lost as their cultured patrons were reduced to wandering refugees known as faidits. Their characteristic concept of "paratge", a whole sophisticated world-view, was almost destroyed, leaving us a pale imitation in our idea of chivalry. Lay learning was discouraged and the reading of the bible became a capital crime. Tithes were enforced. The Languedoc started its long economic decline to become the poorest region in France;  and the language of the area, Occitan, began its descent from the foremost literary language in Europe to a regional dialect, disparaged by the French as a patois. 
At the end of the extermination of the Cathars, the Roman Church had proof that a sustained campaign of genocide can work. It also had the precedent of an internal Crusade within Christendom, and the machinery of the first modern police state that could be reconstructed for the Spanish Inquisition, and again for later Inquisitions and genocides. Chateaubriand referred to the crusade as "this abominable episode of our history". Voltaire observed that "there was never anything as unjust as the war against the Albigensians".
The head of the Catholic Church, Pope Innocent III, called a formal Crusade against the Cathars of the Languedoc, appointing a series of military leaders to head his Holy Army. The first was a Cistercian abbot (Arnaud Amaury), now best remembered for his command at Béziers: "Kill them all. God will know his own". The second was Simon de Montfort now remembered as the father of another Simon de Montfort, a prominent figure in English parliamentary history.  The war against the Cathars of the Languedoc continued for two generations. In the later phases the Kings of France would take over as leaders of the crusade, which thus became a Royal Crusade. Among the many victims who lost their lives were two kings: Peter II King of Aragon cut down at the Battle of Muret in 1213 and Louis VIII King of France who succumbed to dysentery on his way home to Paris in 1226.
From 1208, a war of terror was waged against the indigenous population of the Languedoc and their rulers: Raymond VI of Toulouse,  Raymond-Roger Trencavel, Raymond Roger of Foix in the first generation and Raymond VII of Toulouse, Raymond Trencavel II, and Roger Bernard II of Foix in the second generation. During this period an estimated half-million Languedoc men, women and children were massacred, Catholics as well as Cathars. The Crusaders killed the locals indiscriminately - in line with the the famous injunction recorded by a Cistercian chronicler as being spoken by his fellow Cistercian, the Abbot in command of the Crusader army.
The Counts of Toulouse and their allies were dispossessed and humiliated, and their lands annexed to France.  Educated and tolerant Languedoc rulers were replaced by relative barbarians;  Dominic Guzmán (later Saint Dominic) founded the Dominican Order and soon afterwards the Inquisition, manned by his Dominicans, was established explicitly to wipe out the last vestiges of resistance. Persecutions of Languedoc Jews and other minorities were initiated;  the culture of the troubadours was lost as their cultured patrons were reduced to wandering refugees known as faidits. Their characteristic concept of "paratge", a whole sophisticated world-view, was almost destroyed, leaving us a pale imitation in our idea of chivalry. Lay learning was discouraged and the reading of the bible became a capital crime. Tithes were enforced. The Languedoc started its long economic decline to become the poorest region in France;  and the language of the area, Occitan, began its descent from the foremost literary language in Europe to a regional dialect, disparaged by the French as a patois. 
At the end of the extermination of the Cathars, the Roman Church had proof that a sustained campaign of genocide can work. It also had the precedent of an internal Crusade within Christendom, and the machinery of the first modern police state that could be reconstructed for the Spanish Inquisition, and again for later Inquisitions and genocides. Chateaubriand referred to the crusade as "this abominable episode of our history". Voltaire observed that "there was never anything as unjust as the war against the Albigensians".
Catharism is often said to have been completely eradicated by the end of the fourteenth century.  Yet there are more than a few vestiges even today, apart from the enduring memory of Cathar "Martyrdom" and the ruins of the famous "Cathar castles", including the spectacular castle at Carcassonne and the hilltop Château of Montségur (The Name in Occitan. Click here to find out more about occitan.  Montsegùr).
there are many echoes of influences from the Cathar period, from International geopolitics down to popular culture. There are even Cathars alive today, or at least people claiming to be modern Cathars.  There are historical tours of Cathar sites and also a flourishing, if largely superficial, Cathar tourist industry in the Languedoc, and especially in the Aude département.
As we see the eight-hundredth anniversary of important events, more and more memorials are springing up on the sites of massacres, as at Les Casses, Lavaur, Minerve, and Montségur. There is also an increasing community of historians and other academics engaged in serious historical and other academic Cathar studies. Interestingly, to date, the deeper scholars have dug, the more they have vindicated Cathar claims to represent a survival of an important Gnostic strand of the Earliest Christian Church.
Arguably just as interesting, Protestant ideas share much in common with Cathar ideas, and there is some reason to believe that early reformers were aware of the Cathar tradition. Even today some Protestant Churches claim a Cathar heritage. Tantalisingly, weavers were commonly accused of spreading Protestant ideas in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, just as their antecedents in the same trade had been accused of spreading Cathar ideas in Medieval times.
It can even be argued that in many respects Roman Catholic ideas have shifted over the centuries ever further from the Church's medieval teaching and ever closer to Cathar teaching.

Monsegur et Arques et le Musée Déodat Roché



the massacre of the Occitan Cathars or not, by Cistercian monks and the army of the King of France and the Vatican orders
le massacre des occitans Cathars ou non , par les moines la masacre de los cátaros occitanos o no, por los monjes cistercienses y el ejército del rey de Francia y las órdenes del VaticanoCisterciens et l'armée du Roi de France et les ordres du Vatican
Les tableaux sont visibles dans le musée de la ville d'Arques dans l'AUDE :
http://www.arques-cathare.odexpo.com

  
                    the massacre of Béziers



                       OIL by Claude Dubois

Le massacre de béziers, le 22 juillet 1209 à Béziers c'était la fête appelée la madeleine quand l'abbé de Cîteaux amèna la grande armée des Croisés qui campa autour de Béziers , Ils furent plus de quinze mille, ils marchèrent autour de la ville, pour abattre les murs; ils travaillèrent du pic , fracassèrent les portes. Voyant cela, les bourgeois commencèrent à s'effrayer et, de leur côté, les ...croisés crièrent: « Aux armes, tous! aux armes! » alors ils s'avancèrent contre la ville et repoussèrent des remparts les habitants, qui, prirent leurs enfants et leurs femmes, et se retirèrent dans l'église de la madeleine et firent sonner les cloches , n'ayant plus d'autre refuge. Les bourgeois de Béziers virent venir et s'armer les Français tandis que le roi des ribauds les assaillèrent, et brisèrent les murs et les portes , les bourgeois se réfugièrent dans la cathédrale. Les prêtres catholiques et les clercs se vêtirent de leurs ornements et firent sonner les cloches comme pour dire la messe des morts , mais ils ne purent empêcher qu'avant la fin de la messe les truands d'entrer dans l'église : ils entrèrent dans les maisons; Les ribauds furent ardents au pillage ; ; ils tuèrent ,ils égorgent tout ceux qu'ils rencontrèrent. . On les égorgea tous , on égorgea même ceux qui s'étaient réfugiés dans la cathédrale, rien ne peut les sauver, ni croix, ni crucifix ni autel , Les ribauds Tuèrent les clercs, les femmes, les enfants; personne n'y échappa , ils tuèrent même ceux qui c'étaient réfugiés dans l’église de la Bienheureuse Marie-Madeleine, dont c’était la fête et où plusieurs milliers d'habitants furent massacrés , Que Dieu reçoive leurs âmes au paradis , « au feu ! Au feu !» s'écrièrent-ils, Et ils apportèrent de grandes torches allumées : ils mirent le feu à la ville, La ville brûla toute entière , la cathédrale fut brûlée aussi ,
lo 22 de julhet de 1209 a besiérs , èra la fésta apelada la Magdalena quora l'abat de citeaux amenét la granda armada dels crosats que campét a l'entorn de besiérs, foguéron mai de quinze mila, caminéron a l'entorn de la vila per abatre los parets, trabalhèron del pic , brigalhèron las pòrtas , vesent aquo los borgés comencéron a s'espaventar e de lor costat los crosats cridéron « als armas totes als armas» alavetz s'avancéron contra la vila e rebutéron dels muralhas los estatjants que prenguèron lors mainatges e lors femnas e se retiréron dins la gléisa de la magadalena e faguéron sonar las campanas, n'agent mai d'autra refugi, Los borgés de besiérs vegéron vénguer e s'armar los francés mentre que lo rei dels ribauds los assalhiguèron e briséron los parets e los portas, los borgés se refugiéron dins la catedrala, los curats e los clergues se vestiguéron de lors ornamants e faguéron sonar las campanas coma per diser la messa dels mòrts, mas poguéron pas empachar qu'avant la fin de la messa , los gorrimands dintrar dins la gléisa, dintréron dins las ostals, los ribauds foguéron valents au pilhatge , tuéron, sagnèron totes aquestes que recontréron , los sagnèt totes, sagnèt meteis aquestes que se refugiéron dins la catedrala, rès pòt los salvar ni crotz ni crucifix ni autar, Los ribauds tuéron los clergues , las femnas , los mainatges, deguns n'i escapét, tuèron meteis aquestes que s'èran refugiar dins la glèisa de la benaurosa Maria Magdalena dont èra la fèsta e ont mai d'un milièrs d'estatjants foguèron massacrar, Que diu recèpia lors amas al paradis, « al fuòc , al fuòc « s'escridéron e aportéron de grandas tesas alumadas , metéron lo fuòc a la vila , la vila cremét totes entièra, la catedrala foguét cremada tanben,


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